Steak Size Chart: The Ultimate Guide to Cut, Thickness, and Cooking Tips

When it comes to cooking the perfect steak, one of the most important factors to consider is the thickness of the cut.

A steak that is too thick may end up being overcooked on the outside and undercooked on the inside, while a steak that is too thin may lack flavor and juiciness. But with so many different types of steaks available, it can be difficult to know which thickness is best for each cut.

In this article, we will explore the problem of finding the perfect thickness for your steak, agitate the problems that come with it, and provide a solution in the form of a steak size chart that will guide you in choosing the best thickness for each type of cut.

Why are steaks cut in different sizes of thickness

Why are steaks cut in different sizes of thickness
Why are steaks cut in different sizes of thickness

The size or thickness of a steak can greatly affect the overall cooking and eating experience. Different cuts of beef will have varying levels of fat and marbling, which can affect the cooking time and the level of tenderness. Additionally, personal preference and the number of people being served will also play a role in determining the appropriate thickness of a steak.

A thicker cut of steak, such as a ribeye or a T-bone, will typically have more marbling and fat, which can lead to a juicier and more flavorful steak. These cuts can also handle longer cooking times and higher heat without becoming tough or dry. However, thicker cuts may take longer to cook, so if you’re in a hurry, a thinner cut like a flank or skirt steak may be a better option.

Thin cuts, such as a flank or hanger steak, tend to be less tender than thicker cuts, but they can still be flavorful and delicious. They cook faster and are best served rare or medium-rare. These cuts are also often used for dishes like fajitas or stir-fries where the meat is sliced thinly against the grain, which can help to tenderize it.

In general, the best thickness for your steak will depend on the cut of beef, your personal preference, and the number of people you’re serving.

Our steak size chart below can be a helpful guide in determining the appropriate thickness for your particular steak.

Another factor to consider is the budget. Generally, the thinner the steak, the less it will cost, but the thicker steak will be more expensive. As a result, people can choose the thickness based on their budget and taste preference.

What is the best thickness of a steak?

best thickness steak

The best thickness of a steak can vary depending on the cut of beef and personal preference.

For cuts that are naturally tender, such as a filet mignon or a ribeye, a thickness of about 1-1.5 inches is generally considered to be ideal. These cuts are often best served at medium-rare or rare, and the thinner cut allows for a more even cook and a juicier, more flavorful steak.

For cuts that are less tender, such as a flank or hanger steak, a thickness of about 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch is generally considered to be ideal. These cuts are often best served at medium-rare or rare and are usually sliced against the grain to help tenderize the meat.

For cuts that are ideal for grilling, such as a T-bone or a porterhouse, a thickness of 1.5 inches is considered to be ideal. These cuts are best served at medium-rare, and the thickness allows for a more even cook and a juicier, more flavorful steak.

Ultimately, the best thickness of a steak will depend on the cut of beef and your personal preference. A steak size chart can be a helpful guide in determining the appropriate thickness for your particular steak.

It’s also important to note that some people may prefer a thicker cut for their steaks because it allows for more surface area for the crust to form, which can make the steak more flavorful, while others may prefer thinner cuts because they cook faster and are more tender.

Steak size chart: cut, thickness, and cooking tips

In this section, we will take a look at a steak size chart to help you determine the best thickness for your steak based on the cut of beef and your personal preference.

We will discuss the different cuts of beef and the ideal thickness for each, as well as tips for cooking and serving the perfect steak. Whether you’re a seasoned steak connoisseur or a beginner looking to impress, this guide will provide you with the information you need to make the perfect steak every time.

Type of CutThickness (in inches)Serves (people)
Chuck-eye steak1-1.52-3
Denver Steak0.75-12-3
Flap Steak1-1.52-3
Flank steak0.75-12-3
Hanger steak0.75-12-3
Ribeye and rib steaks1-1.52-3
Rump steak0.75-12-3
Skirt steak0.75-12-3
T-bone steak1-1.52-3
Top blade steak1-1.52-3
Top loin steak1-1.52-3
Top sirloin steak1-1.52-3
Tomahawk steak2-2.52-3
Tenderloin steak0.5-12-3
Tri-tip steak0.75-12-3
Porterhouse steak1.5-22-3

Chuck-eye steak

This cut is a boneless version of the ribeye and it’s considered a budget-friendly option. The ideal thickness for a chuck-eye steak is about 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling, broiling, or pan-searing and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Denver Steak

This cut is also known as the “Denver Cut” and is a newer cut of beef, it’s taken from the shoulder of the cow and is considered a budget-friendly option. The ideal thickness for a Denver steak is around 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Flap Steak

This cut is also known as the “Sirloin Bavette” or “Butcher’s Steak” and it’s considered a budget-friendly option. The ideal thickness for a flap steak is around 1/2 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Flank steak

This cut is a lean cut and is usually sliced against the grain, it’s considered a budget-friendly option. The ideal thickness for a flank steak is around 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Hanger steak

This cut is also known as “butcher’s tenderloin” and it’s considered a budget-friendly option. The ideal thickness for a hanger steak is around 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Ribeye and rib steaks

These cuts are known for their marbling and richness, and are considered a premium option. The ideal thickness for a ribeye and rib steaks is around 1-1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Rump steak

This cut is considered a budget-friendly option and is a lean cut, it’s often used for stews or stir-fries. The ideal thickness for a rump steak is around 3/4 inch to 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Skirt steak

This cut is considered a budget-friendly option and is often used for fajitas or stir-fries. The ideal thickness for a skirt steak is around 3/4 inch to 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

T-bone steak

This cut is considered a premium option and is a combination of a tenderloin and a strip steak. The ideal thickness for a T-bone steak is around 1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Top blade steak

This cut is considered a budget-friendly option and is taken from the shoulder of the cow. The ideal thickness for a top blade steak is around 3/4 inch to 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Top loin steak

This cut is also known as a strip steak and is considered a premium option. The ideal thickness for a top loin steak is around 1-1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Top sirloin steak

This cut is considered a budget-friendly option and is a lean cut of beef. The ideal thickness for a top sirloin steak is around 3/4 inch to 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Tomahawk steak

This cut is considered a premium option and is a bone-in ribeye steak with a long bone. The ideal thickness for a tomahawk steak is around 1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Tenderloin steak

This cut is also known as a filet mignon and is considered a premium option. The ideal thickness for a tenderloin steak is around 1-1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Tri-tip steak

This cut is considered a budget-friendly option and is a lean cut that is often used for roasts. The ideal thickness for a tri-tip steak is around 3/4 inch to 1 inch. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

Porterhouse steak

This cut is considered a premium option and is a combination of a tenderloin and a top loin steak. The ideal thickness for a porterhouse steak is around 1.5 inches. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling or broiling and is best served medium-rare to medium.

How thick are the different weights of steak?

The thickness of a steak can vary depending on the cut of beef and the weight of the steak. Here is a general guide to the thickness of different weights of steak:

  • A 6-ounce steak is typically around 1/2 inch thick.
  • An 8-ounce steak is typically around 3/4 inch thick.
  • A 10-ounce steak is typically around 1 inch thick.
  • A 12-ounce steak is typically around 1 1/4 inches thick.
  • A 16-ounce steak is typically around 1 1/2 inches thick.
  • A 20-ounce steak is typically around 1 3/4 inches thick.

It’s worth noting that thickness also depends on the cut of meat as well, for example, a T-bone steak is typically 1.5 inches thick, while a filet mignon is around 1-1.5 inches thick. Some cuts like ribeye can be thicker, around 2 inches thick.

Which cut of steak is thinnest?

The tenderloin steak, also known as filet mignon, is typically the thinnest cut of steak. The tenderloin is a small, lean muscle that runs along the spine of the animal, it’s not heavily exercised, that’s why it’s the most tender cut of beef.

It’s ideal thickness is around 1-1.5 inches, and it’s considered a premium cut. It’s best cooked using dry-heat methods such as grilling, broiling, or pan-searing and is best served medium-rare to medium.

However, it’s worth noting that some cuts like flank steak, hanger steak, and flap steak can also be thinner than other cuts, usually around 1/2 to 3/4 inches thick.

What are the four grades of steak?

The four grades of steak are Prime, Choice, Select and Standard. These grades are determined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) based on factors such as marbling, maturity, and firmness.

  1. Prime: Prime grade beef is the highest quality and most expensive grade. It has the highest level of marbling, which results in the most tender, juicy, and flavorful steaks. Prime beef is usually only available at high-end restaurants or specialty meat markets.
  2. Choice: Choice grade beef is the next level down from Prime. It has a moderate level of marbling, which results in a less expensive but still tender and flavorful steak. Choice beef is widely available at grocery stores and supermarkets.
  3. Select: Select grade beef is the lowest grade of steak that is considered acceptable for sale to consumers. It has the least amount of marbling and is less tender and flavorful than Prime or Choice grade beef. Select beef is also widely available at grocery stores and supermarkets.
  4. Standard: Standard grade beef is the lowest grade of beef and is not considered as good quality as Select. This grade of beef is usually only used for ground beef, processed meats, and other low-end products.

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